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Equestrian Commission News

Your Horse Has a Voice in San Dimas

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Your horse does have a voice at City Hall! If you have questions, concerns or just want more information about the horses in the City of San Dimas--there is a part of city government wanting to hear from you.

The San Dimas City Council is assisted by the Equestrian Commission, a citizen advisory commission on matters pertaining to trails, equestrian use and horse keeping within the City. The equestrian Commission reviews and makes recommendations to both the Planning Commission and the City Council concerning issues that impact the equestrian community. The Commission reviews the current trail system for improvements and makes recommendations for new trails.

If you have questions about the locations, use and availability of the San Dimas Trail system, please feel free to contact us at City Hall. A member of the Equestrian Commission will be available at the Farmer's Market this season to introduce you to the trail system and provide you with the new City of San Dimas Trail Map.

Members of the Equestrian Commission are Doug Aschenbrenner, Claudia Cook, Marca DeMonaco, Rebecca Pike and Yvette Piccone
i. They meet on the first Tuesday of each month at 6:00 p.m. The agenda is posted at City Hall and here on the City website.   The public is welcome and encouraged to attend the commission meetings. The Council representative to the Equestrian Commission is Councilman Jeff Templeman and City direction is from Assistant City Manager Ken Duran. If you would like to contact the Commission, you may do so through Mr. Duran at (909) 394-6214.

The commissions, committees and boards are an important part of the city government system.

View the San Dimas Trail Map (Adobe Acrobat, 2330KB)

Rainy Weather Hoof Thrush In Horses

Hoof Thrush in horses is a common problem found in the underside of the hoof and can affect the clefts, sole and frog of the hoof. In early stages it is harmless, but left untreated it can cause hoof damage and lameness. Thrush is especially common when rainy weather persists. It can become painful and debilitating for your horse or pony if left untreated.

It is not known whether thrush is caused by a bacteria or a fungus, but most agree that it exists in the soil. There is also speculation that the organism responsible exists in the horse itself. It thrives in damp anaerobic conditions--areas that don't get oxygen, like the clefts of your horses' hooves. A hoof filled with moist dirt and manure is susceptible to thrush. You may not notice thrush during very dry weather, but when wetter weather persists, the infection may increase.

You will quickly recognize thrush if you find a black, moist, foul smelling substance when you clean out the hooves. The thrush will likely be hiding in the deeper areas of the cleft. The smell of thrush is unmistakable. As you clean the hoof the black substance will scrape out but leave dark staining.

Regular, frequent cleaning helps to remove the damp dirt and manure from the hooves, allows air to get to the affected areas, and helps keep the foot drier. If possible, during rainy weather keep your horse's standing area clean and dry. Remove manure, soiled bedding and spoiled hay and remember that regular trimming helps overall hoof health. Proper trimming and shoeing helps prevent under-run or contracted heels and deep clefts where it is easier for thrush bacteria to hide. Talk to your farrier. He or she can make recommendations and help you develop a strategy to keep your horse's hooves healthy.

Use caution in trying some home remedies as they may damage the hoof or may burn healthy foot or skin tissue.

Whoa!

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"Share the road" has a different meaning in the City of San Dimas. We are all reminded often to share the road with bicycles and motorcycles but when you see the yellow horse crossing signs and the white rail fencing along side the city streets you may be sharing the road with horses. San Dimas has miles of multi use trails that are used by horseback riders. These multi use trails are bordered by white rail fencing and some cross walks are equipped with crossing light buttons that are at rider high level.


For the safety of the horse and rider it is important to remember a few easy rules of the road -

* Obey the speed limit or less when you pass horses on the trails adjacent to the street

* Do not honk your horn, rev your engine or make excess noise with your vehicle

* Do not yell at the rider or throw anything out the window of your vehicle

* Stop for horses crossing the street

* Allow plenty of space behind the horse before proceeding through the cross walk

There are three major equestrian centers in the area of Foothill and San Dimas Avenues. You may see more horses in this area; however horses are kept on private property in many areas of San Dimas. Adjacent to two of the equestrian centers is Horsethief Canyon Park. The speed limit on the entry road to the park there is low because of the curving narrow road and the heavy use. In Horesthief Canyon Park are youth soccer fields, the Dog Park a beautiful walking track, picnic areas as well as several multi use trails are located around and through this park. In addition, the public riding arena, that is also used for the annual Rodeo, is located in Horsethief Canyon Park. Because of all of these facilities you may encounter more horses than in other areas.

Trail maps are available at no cost at San Dimas City Hall's temporary location, 186 Village Court, San Dimas or visit the Equestrian Commission both at the Farmer's Market on Wednesday nights this summer. Included in the San Dimas Trail Map are the multi use trails and the bicycle trails. Pick up a map and enjoy a summer hiking or biking adventure, right in your own back yard!

Even the best trained horse can be frightened by a speeding vehicle and loud noises. Please use good judgment when you share the road with the horses of San Dimas. Equestrians are a part of our Western Heritage in the wonderful City of San Dimas.

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